Sensory Efficiency Skills

Image shows a logo representing Sensory Efficiency SkillsSensory efficiency skills refer to “how well an individual receives, transmits, and interprets information about people, objects, and events in the environment, using all sensory systems” (Smith, 2014, p. 117).

Sensory efficiency skills are important for both accessing the core curriculum as well as for accessing all other areas of the Expanded Core Curriculum (ECC). These skills are also important in fostering communication between learners and their peers.

Click on the logo on the right to go to our resources page for Sensory Efficiency Skills. 

Smith, M. (2014). Sensory Efficiency. In Allman, C. B., Lewis, S., & Spungin, S. J. (eds.). ECC essentials: Teaching the expanded core curriculum to students with visual impairments (pp. 117-186). New York, NY: AFB Press.

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