Access Technology Skills

Image shows a logo representing Assistive Technology Skills.

Technology is everywhere in education and home life. Access technologies provide access to information for learning, social interaction or leisure. We have come to rely on technology for many forms of our daily communication and productivity tasks.

Click on the logo on the right to go to our resources page for Access Technology Skills. 

Access technology skills include knowing how to

  • operate and maintain devices
  • navigate operating systems
  • decide which device to use for different tasks.

The PRCVI Outreach team sometimes gets questions about how to read foreign languages, such as French, with screen reading software. By default, most screen readers should read foreign languages as long as they are marked up correctly within the document. But sometimes, settings may have been adjusted or a different speech synthesizer needs to be used. We have created a guide o ...

Microsoft Word has several features that are useful for commenting on documents. These features include Track Changes, which allow groups to collaborate on editing documents, as well as comments, which allow individuals to make suggestions or provide feedback. These features are often used within post-secondary and workplace environments. The PRCVI outreach team has provided s ...

On Friday, June 19, 2020, Vince Tomassetti, Program Manager at Assistive Technology - British Columbia (AT-BC), joined PRCVI for a discussion on what students should know about getting assistive technology in place in post-secondary education. This informative one-hour session was attended remotely by students and TSVIs from across the province. The conversation was not recorde ...

As a follow up to our original guide for supporting students with visual impairments using Microsoft Teams, we have created two guides that are focused on input devices for iOS with VoiceOver - a QWERTY keyboard or a braille display with six-key entry.  VoiceOver Navigation in Microsoft Teams with a Braille Display VoiceOver Navigation in Microsoft Teams with a QWERTY Keyboar ...

Many teachers are using the Microsoft Teams app on iOS devices with their students. The PRCVI outreach team has spent some time testing the app with VoiceOver and determining the most efficient strategies for navigation using gestures. This first guide covers general navigation of the app with VoiceOver commands. VoiceOver Navigation in Microsoft Teams (PDF) ...

With many students using iPads to access online curriculum resources, we have created some guides to how to use VoiceOver features that may be helpful.Two guides cover how to use and customize the VoiceOver rotor. The rotor feature allows for rapid navigation around the screen, rather than having to move through every on-screen item searching for the needed content. VoiceOver ...

With the growing number of online meetings that students are participating in nowadays, they may need to share their screen with their teachers or other meeting participants. For students who use VoiceOver on iPads/iPhones, we've created a couple of guides that navigate the process for screen sharing during online meetings in Zoom or Microsoft Teams.  VoiceOver Screen Sharing ...

Many school districts throughout the province are implementing Microsoft Teams for distance learning. Teams is quite accessible to blind and visually impaired students, but information on how to set up Teams for students can sometimes be hard to find. We've created some resources to help TSVIs in getting their students up and running with Teams. Below are several reference doc ...

Every student who uses Windows will encounter menus in their daily computer use, both offline and online. Navigating these menus with a screen reader can seem complex at first, but once a student has the skills to navigate menus, they can use these skills across many different programs. Learning to navigate menus also allows students to discover shortcuts for new programs or fr ...

The PRCVI outreach team has had a few requests this school year for assistance with students that are having a difficult time seeing what teachers are presenting to the class when projecting their screens from computers or tablets. Finding an in-class solution resulted in an online solution.   We were invited to help find a screen casting solution whereby students could have a ...

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